REACHING FOR THE RING – 06.16.2017: A Women’s Money in the Bank? No Thanks!


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June 16, 2017

This Sunday, June 18, 2017 WWE’s SmackDown Live takes center stage at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis, Missouri for the company’s annual Money in the Bank event. One of the featured attractions scheduled to take place is quite the milestone as pertaining to women’s wrestling within the WWE.

For the first time in the history of the company’s Women, Superstars will be competing in a Money in the Bank Ladder Match. The objective of the match is the same as the male counterparts. To emerge the victor, one must withstand the lawless brutality inflicted upon them by their opponents, scale a ladder to great heights above the ring and secure the Money in the Bank Briefcase. In achieving this grand feat the victory will have won the right to challenge for the SmackDown Live Women’s Championship at any time of their choosing. 

The announcement and eventual execution of this Women’s Money in the Bank Ladder match is the most recent “advancement” in a movement the WWE likes to boast as the “Women’s Revolution.” While there is no denying the opportunities afforded to some incredibly talented individuals in the wake of this revolution, this professional wrestling enthusiast has taken a great deal of issue with the purpose behind and execution of the movement since its very conception. Where storylines and in-ring achievements should center around characters, conflict and athleticism the focal point largely targets gender equality for the sake of equality. Instead of tremendous storytelling these, what should be grand, achievements are typically sold as “first time.” Rather than invoking a deeper emotional investment from the audience they typically book to the lowest common denominator in the hopes that political correctness will appeal to the masses.

From the beginning the creative drive behind this first ever Women’s Money in the Bank Match has proven my view points to stand correct. In what could have been an unbelievable build to a forever memorable announcement the match was presented as a spur of the moment stroke of genius by SmackDown Live General Manager Shane McMahon. From there the competitors announced to compete, aside from Charlotte Flair and possibly Beck Lynch, leave much to be desired when it comes to a match of this magnitude.

What should have happened…

Post-WrestleMania 33, subtly begin a social media campaign with Trish Stratus overly praising the efforts of all the Women Superstars. It will soon be evident that Trish has reached out to WWE Officials with an idea she sells as “passing the torch.” As speculation grows as to what Trish is speaking towards it is announced that she will be appearing on SmackDown Live two nights following the Backlash event.

During that episode of SmackDown Live, Trish takes center stage during the night’s final segment to make the momentous announcement of the first ever Women’s Money in the Bank match. From there Trish explains that there has been an agreement made between all of the WWE’s Brands to allow the top competition to become eligible for the match. The only catch being the briefcase remains exclusive to SmackDown Live. Qualifying matches will take place on all Brands the following week.

Following the qualifying matches, the participants are revealed to be Charlotte Flair, Sasha Banks, Bayley, Becky Lynch, Natalya  Nikki Bella, Alexa Bliss and Asuka (Yes, two outside champions.)

This scenario presents one of WWE’s greatest legends, Trish Stratus, providing the set up for the a match involving the company’s current top crop of female performers. The match showcases great rivalrie, characters, athleticism and true star power.

Moving forward with the Women’s Revolution involving the Red and Blue Brands it would be nice to see the creative minds behind the wheel buckle down and invest serious time into developing well constructed and emotion provoking programs and moments for these very talented ladies.


 

 

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